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The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained

The black-and-white picture ‘The Tragedy of Macbeth,’ directed by Joel Coen, centres around an army general’s quest for dominance. Based on William Shakespeare’s famous tragedy, the drama film depicts the psychological struggles of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth as they commit horrible acts to grab the kingdom.

The Joel-directed film, which stars Denzel Washington, Frances McDormand, Alex Hassell, and Bertie Carvel in important roles, pulls from the ideals of German expressionism and portrays a riveting slow-burning narrative of ambition and remorse. You’ve come to the right site if you’re looking for an explanation of the narrative and finish of ‘The Tragedy of Macbeth.’ WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD.

Plot Synopsis for The Tragedy of Macbeth

The film begins with the Weird Sisters muttering about meeting Macbeth, the Thane of Glamis and a general in Duncan, King of Scotland’s army. Then we witness Ross, a Scottish noble and messenger, inform King Duncan that Macbeth has won the fight against the two invading armies of Ireland and Norway. King Duncan orders the Thane of Cawdor’s execution and decrees that his title be bestowed to Macbeth in recognition of his valiant achievements in the war.

We soon see Macbeth and Banquo, Thane of Lochaber and general in King Duncan’s army, traveling over a heath. The Thane of Cawdor is addressed by the Weird Sisters, who had been waiting for Macbeth. “Hail, Macbeth!” Thane of Glamis, hail to thee. Macbeth deserves to be praised. Thane of Cawdor, hail to thee. Macbeth deserves to be praised. “That shalt be king afterwards,” prophesy the three witches, meaning that Macbeth will become Thane of Cawdor and eventually King of Scotland.

The Weird Sisters then warn Banquo, who approaches them skeptically, that he would father a succession of monarchs. Ross later informs Macbeth that he has been appointed Thane of Cawdor. Macbeth immediately begins to consider the prophecy; he is concerned that his ambition is beginning to trump his morality and loyalty. Lady Macbeth soon receives a letter from her husband in which he reveals the prophecy of the Weird Sisters. She is overjoyed that, despite their advanced age, they may experience true power.

Lady Macbeth is soon notified that her husband and King Duncan are on their way, and she begins to plan the king’s assassination in her head. Following that, she persuades the distraught Macbeth that he must assassinate the king and seize the throne for himself. Macbeth, on the other hand, feels guilty because he is the king’s kinsman, subject, and host. He tries to back out of the murder plot, but Lady Macbeth informs him that if he follows ahead with it, he will be a “greater man.” She goes on to say that after the murder, they’ll mourn King Duncan’s death so no one would suspect them.

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The End of Macbeth’s Tragedy: Does Macbeth Kill King Duncan? Does He Ascend to the Throne of Scotland?

Thus, late at night, Macbeth enters King Duncan’s room — where the grooms are inebriated as a result of Lady Macbeth — and plunges a dagger into his ruler’s throat. Lady Macbeth is ecstatic about the murder, but Macbeth is visibly disturbed by it. He starts hearing voices telling him that he “killed slumber” and that he will no longer be able to sleep; a loud thudding sound also starts bothering him. Thus, we see the beginnings of Macbeth’s journey into insanity, as his remorse shows itself in the form of sounds, murmurs, and black ravens.

The Thane of Fife, Macduff, then arrives at the castle. When he arrives to meet King Duncan, he discovers that he has died. While the others are distracted, Macbeth murders the two inebriated grooms to make it appear that they were the murderers. Soon, there is a commotion in the castle, and Macbeth pretends to be terribly touched by the death of his monarch.

Duncan’s sons, Malcolm and Donalbain, decide to flee to England and Ireland, respectively, knowing they are in danger. Macbeth later travels to Dunsinane to be anointed King of Scotland. As a result, the prophecy of the Weird Sisters comes true. Of course, we can argue that Macbeth only required some supernatural or otherwise to persuade him to conduct a political assassination in order to gain the authority he has coveted for years.

Meanwhile, Macbeth learns that Banquo and his son, Fleance, are threats to him as a result of the Weird Sisters’ final prophecy; in order to protect himself, he resolves to end their long-standing military and personal relationship. As a result, the King of Scotland employs two goons to assassinate the Thane of Lochaber and his son. At this time, we see that Macbeth, blinded by greed, is sinking deeper into the pit of immorality.

In another scene, we see Macbeth enraged at the prospect of his hard work (read: murder) resulting in Banquo’s children inheriting the throne in the future. To Lady Macbeth, he rages that he did not bloody his hands for a “fruitless crown.” As a result, we can see that the royal couple is incapable of thinking beyond themselves.

The thugs kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes. Indeed, Ross assists the Thane of Lochaber’s son in fleeing to safety. We understand that Ross has simply been looking out for himself the entire time, shifting allegiances according on who is on the winning side. Macbeth is haunted by Banquo’s ghost and the ravens at the royal feast. Lady Macbeth tries to calm Macbeth down as he loses his head and shouts about the killings in front of the court. We see that the burden of guilt is heavier on the King’s shoulders than on the Queen’s. This could be because Macbeth, an army officer, is battling with the idea of being disloyal, whilst the Queen is simply appreciating what she believes is their due.

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The following day, Macbeth chooses to speak with the Weird Sisters once more. The witches allow him to communicate with their master while perched on the roof. Macbeth sees the faces of infants — the future rulers — in the water on the floor beneath his feet (which serves as the cauldron). One youngster warns him that Macduff is a menace, while another advises him to be “bloody and firm” since “none of the woman born shall harm Macbeth.” “Macbeth shall never be vanquished till great Birnam Wood and high Dusinane Hill come against him,” a third child declares.

At this time, we learn that Macbeth is feeling fairly secure, yet it is impossible for a man to be created without the help of a woman — hence, no one can assassinate the King. Furthermore, because the forests cannot reach the castle, Macbeth feels persuaded that he is indestructible. However, we soon discover that he is only hearing what he wants to hear. Furthermore, he wishes to be reassured that he will not suffer the consequences of his horrific deeds.

Is Ross responsible for Lady Macbeth’s death? Who assassinates Macbeth?

Lady Macbeth arrives in order to inform her husband that Macduff has escaped to England (where we know Malcolm is). As a result, Macbeth resolves to attack the kingdom of Fife because Macduff has made his loyalties plain. In truth, shortly after King Duncan’s death, Macduff suspected Macbeth of murder but did not act on his suspicions.

Lady Macbeth soon begins to pluck her hair and neglects her personal hygiene. The enormous psychological strain of being implicated in a political assassination has also taken its toll on her. Watching her spouse devolve into a furious shell of his former self is also causing the Queen pain. Then, just before Macduff’s wife and children are slaughtered by Macbeth’s men, Ross meets them.

Ross hurries to meet Malcolm and Macduff and, upon learning that they intend to attack Dusinane, informs them that the Thane of Fife’s family has been murdered. Ross clearly does this to save his own neck and be in the good graces of those who are most likely to win. Malcolm intends to attack Macbeth’s fortress with the Earl of Northumberland, King Duncan’s brother, and 10,000 warriors. As a kind of retaliation, Macduff swears to kill Macbeth himself.

Meanwhile, Lady Macbeth has lost control of herself in Dusinane. She walks through the corridors in her nightgown, holding a light aloft and thinking about the murders. The maid informs the doctor that the Queen frequently walks in her sleep. Lady Macbeth likewise continues to wash her hands (which she imagines to be bloody) and wails. Guilt, anguish, and a profound sense of loss had clearly taken over her soul.

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Seyton, the King’s senior servant, and others notify Macbeth that Malcolm’s warriors are on their way. Meanwhile, Ross approaches Lady Macbeth, who is huddled at the top of a stairwell. Seyton informs Macbeth that the Queen has died in the following scene. Ross clearly shoved her from the top of the steps, as seen by her limp body at the bottom. This is a significant deviation from Shakespeare’s original piece, in which Lady Macbeth is encouraged to commit suicide. However, Ross’ actions demonstrate the perilous nature of the political game. By assassinating the Queen, he guarantees that Macbeth’s doom is at least partially ensured.

The woods have begun to move, and Macbeth is alerted. Macbeth had been stupidly unafraid of the conflict up to this moment because he believed he was invincible. However, we learn that the Weird Sisters’ prophecy is meant to be taken literally – Malcolm, Siward, and Macduff’s warriors are holding lush branches and marching towards the castle, creating the impression that an entire forest is on the move.

When Siward enters the castle, he discovers Macbeth on the throne. Fuming, he rushes the King with a sword, which Macbeth deftly avoids. He inquires as to whether Siward was born of a woman; his demeanor suggests that he is still certain that no man has not been born of a woman and hence feels that he cannot be killed. Macbeth dispatches Siward in a flash.

Macbeth ventures out and meets Macduff, who has come to revenge his family. The two fight violently with swords, and the Thane of Fife decapitates Macbeth in a single sweeping swoop. In reality, Macbeth loses his head when he bends down to pick up his fallen crown. Thus, in another cruel twist of destiny (or possibly justice), Macbeth dies while attempting to wear the crown for which he killed. Despite the fact that it is not revealed in the film, the play emphasizes that Macduff was born via Cesarean section. Thus, the witches’ prophecy must be interpreted literally once more – Macduff was not born naturally from a woman’s body and is thus the one who will ultimately slay Macbeth.

After Macbeth, who will be the next King of Scotland? Fleance, Banquo’s son, is missing.

Ross grabs the crown and Macbeth’s head and approaches Malcolm, the eldest son of King Duncan and the new King of Scotland. Later, we see Ross encounter the Old Man (in disguise as the Weird Sisters) and discover that he has been plotting with supernatural powers all along. The Old Man gives Fleance to Ross, and we learn that the Scottish noble intends to take Banquo’s son to court in order for the witches’ prophecy to come true. Thus, the late Macbeth’s meticulously planned political murders are futile since the prophecy finds a way to come true due to the King’s incapacity to look beyond his greed and humiliation.

The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained
The Tragedy of Macbeth Ending Explained

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