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The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film

The Adam Project Review – Catherine Keener plays a time-traveling ruler who only wants Adam to return to the future she controls (and if he doesn’t, she’ll kill him). Keener is flanked by a legion of faceless goons, whom Big and Little Adam dispatch in a series of flashy set pieces, aided by futuristic weaponry that Little Adam is very fond of (it’s a good thing these goons are faceless, or we’d be watching a 12-year-old joyfully murdering a series of strangers…) The gadgets and spaceship pursuits have a Star Wars feel to them, with Reynold channelling Han Solo and Scobell channelling Anakin from The Phantom Menace. And the time travel, as well as the Daddy- and Mummy-problems that come with it, is straight out of Back To The Future.

If that wasn’t enough, throw in Zoe Saldana as a lost love interest from the future who is a total badass but isn’t in it very much, as well as all the sciencey macguffins you can eat. The Adam Project tries to distract you with emotional whammies while you’re trying to figure out what the laws of the exploding stuff that the gang needs to do something with are, and which specific time travel model the film is following (we suspect it’s the Grandfather paradox).

The Adam Project has it all: romance, lost love, and suspense. The meaning of death and what a well-lived life implies Memory’s structure. Learning to love oneself (yes, it’s possible!). There are also spaceships, robots, light sabres, and other gadgets.

As a result, the film is a little sloppy. But it’s also unabashedly amusing. It’s schmaltzy, lovely, and nostalgic, and while it’s nothing like Don’t Look Up in tone or style, a scene between Big Adam, Little Adam, and their father has shades of the “We really did have everything, didn’t we?” moment in that apocalyptic vision. We don’t think it’s too much of a spoiler to say that The Adam Project isn’t quite as gloomy and nihilistic as Don’t Look Up. It’s more of a hug your mother, catch with your father, and cuddle the dog vibe. Alternatively, curl up with your loved ones and watch The Adam Project, basking in its goodness or picking apart its flaws: whatever suits your fancy.

See also  Operation Gold Fish (2019)

The Adam Project will be available on Netflix on March 11.

The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film
The Adam Project Review: Ryan Reynolds Attempts Time Travel in Netflix’s Newest Film

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